Rise of the Guardians Analyzations
Jack Frost, Jean Paul Sartre and the existentialsm

Recently, I’ve notivced something about Rotg and Jack Frost.

It might be a movie for children and some people might be right when they say that Jack is the average hero. As long as you don’t think about it twice.

I just did so and I realised that Jack Frost is the ultimate example of the existentialism. I don’t really know if I believe in that theory or not, but I really like to think about the sense in everything and therefore I’ve read nearly every workpiece from Jean Paul Sartre. Apperantly he is one of my favourite writers and that’s why I’m really excited  about the whole thing with Jack Frost.

I’ll try to explain why I think so:

A part of existentialism says that the essence comes befor the existence, which is really obvious since you can’t create something that you don’t know. If you want to invent a chair, you first have to imagine a chair which you can build later. You can’t build a chair if you don’t have the idea of a chair.

Since humans are not build like a chair they are excluded from that rule.

To explain the rule of existence for humans, the following example can be used:

When you draw something really good, something that could be an artwork, but lock it away so no one can see it, it will never be an artwork because there is no one who can define that piece of work as an artwork or anything else. It is THERE but it has no definition and so it is basically nothing.

For example in “Huis Clos”, a story which is set in hell and where the three main characters are tortured by the ultimate love triangle, Sartre points out that the interaction between the main characters is necessary to define them. Even though their relationship destroys them, even though they hate each other and even though it would be easier for them to avoid each other they can’t do that because they need someone to reflect them and therefore to prove their existence.

I think that you can guess what I want to say with that.

We all know that Jack has been invisible for 300 years. Apparently he does not know who he is, even though he is supposed to know that, according to what Tooth told him about his memories.

There are many evidences that show that.

When Jack was born, the moon told him his name. I can see the moon in rotg as an example for god in our world. He left Jack in that world where nobody can see him, and where he has no chance to interact.

He had no chance to define and reflect himself.

Later he had that arguement with the Easter Bunny in which Bunny sair: “You are invisible. It’s like you don’t even EXIST” And he is completly true with that because even though Jack is there, he does not exist because he does not know who he is just like no other person knows that.

The same can be seen in the conversation between North and Jack, because there it’s really obvious that Jack does not know who he is.

During the whole time that he spends with the other guardians he interacts with them so he is able to get to know himself a little better and in the end he is complete and finally he exists.

So basically he realised that he is not that asshole that he was told to be, but learned who he really is and that explains why there is that incredible transformation in his character.

Also, the whole plot, which is about believing and being seen, reflects the existentialism since all the immortals have the same risk of loosing their definition when they are not able to interact anymore.

Therefore, the movie has another message to me than the one we already know. It’s about the nature of humans. The human need of interaction, which is as important as drinking and eating. That we don’t have a purpose as a single person but as a huge crowd of people who define each other and who give each other a reason to stay alive.

For me, the meaning of life is interaction. And that movie shows that.

That’s why I believe that Rotg is more than an average movie for children

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dial5forguardians:

You know, ROTG has a lot of parallels that happen throughout the movie. And while watching it again I realized that Jack’s big ice ramp/loop thing at the end of the movie

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Is kinda similar to North’s ice train ramp/loop thing

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Which makes me wonder if he made that because he noticed North’s toy ramp in his workshop and wanted to re-create a life sized one, or if he just remembered that North likes loop-de-loops? Or maybe Jack just wanted to make a big ice ramp, it could be anything haha. Jack did make a ramp earlier in the movie when he sent Jamie flying off of it, but just nothing this big, so I wondered if it had any relation.

Also, another tiny bit I noticed at the end: They pass by a man walking his dog, and the dog looks up at Jack and the others while the man looks down at the forming ice. I’ve always read about things like animals being able to see spirits and whatnot, so I thought this was neat of them to put in the movie :)

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So yeah. Just things I’ve noticed.

Jack Frost’s Staff

cupidnova:

thesecondsnowflake:

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Can we talk about it for a minute?

The staff doesn’t have frost or anything on it until Jack looks at it and then touches it. And if you pay attention later in the movie, the staff only has frost where he’s touching it.

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And when he’s not touching it, there’s no frost at all.

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So really the animators have been telling us the entire movie that Jack’s powers came from himself, not his staff. Which makes THIS scene really sad:

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Because it tells us that, since Jack is looking to his staff as the source of the massive ice attack that sent Pitch flying, he doesn’t even believe in HIMSELF anymore. He looks to the staff and the powers he THINKS it possesses to try to prove himself to the Guardians and to get kids to believe in him. Not by being himself.

He’s stereotyping himself and trying to be what he thinks he ought to be to get people to believe in him.

Sounds like trying to “fit in” in middle school…

So regaining his memories, after pretty much handing the victory to Pitch through his mistakes, was not just him discovering himself- he was accepting himself. The way he was. Invisible, yes, but truly and undeniably Jack, not just Jack Frost. He didn’t need outside validation anymore because he accepted who he was, mistakes and all, and that brought out his powers so he could fix the staff (still a helpful tool) and animate that frost bunny (with his hands- not his staff) later in Jamie’s room.

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Kind of cool.

Just a little blurb I want to add to this amazing explanation:

I always thought Jack’s staff was just a medium that his powers were channeled through, like a wizard and his wand. Jack always had his powers, but they’re more haphazard without the staff (Look at the ice lighting) because there isn’t something to direct any sort of magic. 

The ice lightning may have happened while Jack was holding his staff, but the first time he used it, he kinda directed it with his hands instead of his staff, causing it to be this huge mass of ice lightning. The second time he uses it, he tries channeling it through his staff, and Pitch is able to absorb/deflect it (I don’t know what he’s doing in that scene). Jack may be more powerful than anyone knows, he just needs to stop focusing all his attention on using his staff as a medium for his magic.

About the Adults in ROTG

dial5forguardians:

First of all, this post is a result of over thinking at 3 in the morning when I couldn’t sleep, so expect something complicated and probably pointless but an interesting read nontheless? Maybe I shouldn’t even be thinking this much about a family movie…

Also, this post is going to be based solely on the movie, so if there’s anything in the books/comics/etc, please correct me if I’m wrong on this topic!

This is something that’s also been bugging me for awhile, and I had to work through it. I watched ROTG again and I asked myself: Do the parents believe in the Guardians?

At this point I’m sure you’re going “of course not, they’re adults, they’ve grown up, they don’t believe!”

But for the longest time didn’t see anything that proved that.

The only proof we get is when Jamie asks his mother who Jack Frost was, and his mother replied “no one honey, it’s just an expression!” But this was only for Jack Frost. She did not believe in Jack Frost and at that point in time no one else did either. She does ask Jamie later in the movie who Jamie was talking to in his bedroom, and when he replied “Jack Frost?” she didn’t believe him either then.

The other thing his mother said to take note of, is when Jamie loses a tooth and she tells him to go to sleep or the Tooth Fairy won’t come. (I know, this is a moot point considering this is very similar to what my parents told me for Santa if I wasn’t in bed on time, but still…) Her saying this doesn’t really point to whether or not she believed in Tooth.

Knowing this, there are a couple specific scenes in this movie that really bugged me concerning the adults and the Guardians that I want to go over.

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1) The Easter Bunny and the Egg Hunt

Why would the city people of Burgess (some other city, had to correct that. I see the eggs on the banner have those hats :) ) put up a giant Easter Egg Hunt banner, and then do nothing further than this? Remember, the kids in this movie said they couldn’t find any eggs. They weren’t carrying full baskets. This implies that Bunnymund is in charge of every single egg on the planet that hides during Easter.

Did these city people think that they should put up a banner around Easter time because something magical happens and easter eggs just show up in the woods? Did they think someone else did the work of putting out the eggs when no one was looking?

I thought this over and came up with another explanation: There were eggs there, but the plastic ones you see that usually have coins or chocolate in them. Maybe the kids saw these, knew they were from the adults, and looked specifically for Bunnymund’s specially painted eggs instead because they knew it was from the bunny himself. Finding none, they gave up and called it quits on Easter, and didn’t even want to take the plastic eggs home. Either that or the nightmares crushed the plastic eggs too in order to get rid of every single evidence of Easter (but this is hard to really say, because North did say “nothing made it to the surface”).

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2) Tooth Fairy and leaving coins

This one was a bit more of a challenge. Why didn’t the parents leave behind coins for the kids once they left a tooth under their pillow? This is evident when Pitch is talking about children waking up and still finding their lost tooth under their pillows.

My possible other explanation is that these kids didn’t tell parents about their loose tooth, and just immediately left it under their pillow for the Tooth Fairy to pick up since it has happened to them before and they obviously believe in her. What do you guys think?

There are other scenes I thought of but considering North, such as

- North’s sleigh crashing onto the ground

- An extra present or two showing up under the Christmas tree specifically from North (this is outside from the movie, but I’m going off of when they were sliding down the road and North tossed two kids a couple of gifts.)

- Pitch’s nightmare sand engulfing cars and destroying power lines

I couldn’t come up with anything for these. And whether or not they believe in Pitch is another story.

But hey, at least that’s one reason I like this movie, you can back up things happening with plausible facts. This at least leads me to thinking that the adults truly don’t believe in the Guardians, and that the Guardians only protect children because they are obviously weaker than adults, and need some cheer in their lives. And like I said, if I’m wrong about something, please clarify, I haven’t read the books or comics. What do you guys think?

Just my thoughts (at 3 am)~

Jack Frost’s Staff

thesecondsnowflake:

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Can we talk about it for a minute?

The staff doesn’t have frost or anything on it until Jack looks at it and then touches it. And if you pay attention later in the movie, the staff only has frost where he’s touching it.

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And when he’s not touching it, there’s no frost at all.

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So really the animators have been telling us the entire movie that Jack’s powers came from himself, not his staff. Which makes THIS scene really sad:

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Because it tells us that, since Jack is looking to his staff as the source of the massive ice attack that sent Pitch flying, he doesn’t even believe in HIMSELF anymore. He looks to the staff and the powers he THINKS it possesses to try to prove himself to the Guardians and to get kids to believe in him. Not by being himself.

He’s stereotyping himself and trying to be what he thinks he ought to be to get people to believe in him.

Sounds like trying to “fit in” in middle school…

So regaining his memories, after pretty much handing the victory to Pitch through his mistakes, was not just him discovering himself- he was accepting himself. The way he was. Invisible, yes, but truly and undeniably Jack, not just Jack Frost. He didn’t need outside validation anymore because he accepted who he was, mistakes and all, and that brought out his powers so he could fix the staff (still a helpful tool) and animate that frost bunny (with his hands- not his staff) later in Jamie’s room.

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Kind of cool.

Jack’s Little Sister

thesecondsnowflake:

Because I’m kind of exploding.

As we know, the Guardians lose their powers as children stop believing in them. Tooth can no longer fly, North goes from epic Cossak warrior to gimpy grandpa, and Bunny is just… cute.

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But Jack remains his boss self seemingly in spite of kids’ unbelief. He completely overpowers Pitch after Sandy’s death and still holds his own when Pitch is nearing the peak of his power. Granted, Pitch isn’t trying to kill him then, but I think it’s still a pretty good display.

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Seriously though. Completely awesome, in the original sense of the word.

But what is the source of Jack’s power? Clearly not the belief of those 12 and under. If the Man on the Moon could give such powers, I imagine he would’ve given the guardians a little boost in their last encounter with Pitch instead of allowing the children to risk themselves. No, Jack’s power comes from someone else. Jack’s power comes from his sister.

image"You have to believe in me.”

And she does. So much so, in fact, that her belief alone has sustained Jack Frost for 300 years without even the slightest faltering. Even when Jack doubts himself, his powers remain the same.

Is it so crazy that a little girl, whose brother sacrificed himself to save, might be shocked at his death? Would it be strange for her to hope that maybe, just maybe, he was OK? To wonder at what he could’ve done if he had power over the ice that had cracked beneath him? And dream about how much fun he would have, flying on the wind all over the world and playing tricks like he always did?

What better way for her to keep her brother alive!

And that’s what she did!

The Man on the Moon may have chosen Jack and made him a guardian, but it was the belief and love of his little sister that gave him his true powers.

Jack as a Big Brother

thesecondsnowflake:

Because I realized something recently and I love him, like, even more now.

We’re all familiar with Jack’s bare feet and ratty trousers, plus the cord wrapped around the lower halves of his legs.

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And we can remember his little sister’s dress, with no tattering at the hem, and boots.

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And I’m pretty sure Jack’s mom would’ve made him wear socks under his ice skates, considering they’re ice skating in winter and frostbite is a thing.

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So either Jack Frost was abused and his sister was the favorite child (which is doubtful considering he glanced back LOVINGLY at his mom THREE times before going skating)…

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Or Jack did without so his little sister and his mom could have a bit more.

Considering how eagerly Jack’s sister chases after him in his Easter flashback, it’s pretty safe to say her clothes went through about as much wear-and-tear as Jack’s did, but her hem is pristine.

Jack’s pant legs are not only tattered, but really short and form-fitting, especially when you compare his attire to this other boy:

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His pants are loose and go all the way down to the tops of his shoes. The cords wrapped around Jack’s legs were probably an attempt to keep the fabric from tearing.

Plus we know for the handy Rise of the Guardians app that Jack was born in early colonial times, when the people going over to the Americas had literally nothing left for them in England.

And do we see Jack’s dad anywhere? No, because he was probably out working a plantation for a criminally low wage.

So Jack did his best to make sure his sister and his mom got what they needed, while he probably wore that same pair of pants for years and ran around bare foot, trying to make people laugh even though times were tough.

Jack was an excellent big brother.

Overanalyzing Rise of the Guardians: The Big Finish

missdoodle:

Ok, so today we’re going to talk about the finale of RotG, specifically the ‘Pitch in the Hole’ sequence in terms framing and pacing, and I’m going to point out why I think so many people take up issue with this scene. 

First, let’s look at the progression of events leading to the scene in question. 

After the climax of the film, Pitch is defeated and the story moves into it’s falling action. We see the heroes all celebrating, laughing, and playing with the children. Then we cut to Pitch, who has just regained consciousness, to see his reaction. This moment in the film is framed as being sad; the score, if you listen closely, takes a turn for the melancholy as we see Pitch’s devastation when he realizes what this failure means for him. In this scene, despite being the villain, he is made to be sympathetic. We even see this in the way the Guardian’s initially react to him.

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While Tooth, Bunny, and North’s expressions remain somewhat unreadable, Jack’s expression is clearly one of sympathy and concern, and as the protagonist/audience avatar, Jack’s reaction here is the most important. 

We then see Pitch run away, terrified. The scene follows him as his frantic retreat leads us back to the frozen pond where the story began. Here there is an abrupt tonal shift. Almost immediately he encounters the Guardians again. They’ve cut him off, assumably to bar his escape and exact some form of justice. This comes in the form of Tooth approaching him (while he’s on the ground, defenseless and scared) and punching him in the face. This is framed as comical. At this point, the sympathetic angle has been dropped, and the Guardians, Jack specifically, adopt looks of smug victoriousness. Their enemy is rendered week and defenseless, and they react with aggression.  

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What happens next is yet another abrupt shift embodied, again, in how Jack reacts to the events unfolding around him. 

First, we see a look of horror as he watched Pitch dragged off by the Nightmares. 

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Wether or not this was the intention, Jack’s reaction here can easily be read as sympathy/concern for Pitch. But immediately after, we revert to this.

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Jack looks up at the moon with a grin and Pitch is never shown nor mentioned again. He’s simply out of the film, and the story moves on as though he had never been part of it in the first place. 

So what’s wrong with this sequence?

As mentioned earlier, pacing. The events of this scene unfold at breakneck speed and don’t allow for the appropriate tonal shifts needed to accommodate what’s happening and how these events are meant to be framed. One moment the Guardians (and the audience) are feeling sorry for Pitch; the next, the Guardians have chased him down like angry villagers to exact revenge and we the audience are meant to see this as a funny, satisfying resolution. But it all happens too fast, and, in my opinion, much too late.

By this point in the film Pitch was already rendered harmless. We witnessed his first comeuppance at the hands of Sandy, who uppercuts him so hard that he flies a good 100 kilometers or so in the air and is knocked unconscious by the impact of his landing. This worked. It was well timed, just as the moment when Pitch was still an active threat to the other characters, and had been framed accordingly. 

But when the Guardians corner him at the frozen pond, Pitch had not ten seconds ago been framed as sympathetic. We see the other characters react to his situation with looks of concern/pity. There is absolutely no transition between this sympathy and the merciless aggression we see as they gang up on him. Despite being framed as ‘in the right’ it is hard not to view them as something like a gang of thugs. They taunt him, Tooth assaults him, and then the all stand by as he’s savaged by a heard of dangerous demonic horses. 

There is a jarring shift between the two scenes, as well as the scene that follows. In nearly a split second we go from this:

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To this:

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No transition whatsoever. Pitch is just out of the movie. It happens. It’s over. No one reacts to it or mentions it ever again and the plot quickly moves on to Victorious Celebration Part 2. 

My issued with this scene are not a matter of who is in the right and who is in the wrong. It’s a matter of poor framing and transition. It comes across as indecision on the filmmaker’s part. It’s as if they couldn’t decide how to deal with Pitch at the end of the film, or rather, what angle to take. Sympathy or Righteous Punishment? In the end, probably pressed for time, the crammed both angles together and it comes off not only messy, but jarring, confusing, and even upsetting. 

Globe Shots

dial5forguardians:

I saw somewhere on a post that we should get all of the shots of the globe so we could read what was on it. I tried getting all of the close shots that would be readable. Enjoy! (they’re pretty big images, too).

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Sing your heart out, Pitch.

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For reading the coded language, please see this post: http://anavar-immela.tumblr.com/post/47168465976

If you guys think I’m missing some good shots, let me know. I’ll see what I can do.

lbigreyhound13:

So, I finally got my hands on The Art of Rise of the Guardians book yesterday, and I got to say that it was the best choice I ever made! The book is just awesome! I just love looking at the changes and processes the cast and crew went through to get this movie out onto the big screen. However, while I was reading it, I finally came across Jack’s section in the book, and I noticed that it talks about how Jack was risen from the lake in the “early 1600s.”

Now, a lot of fans assumed that the present-day in the movie takes place in 2012, the year it was released. So, if you were to subtract 2012 from the 300 years Jack has been alive that would put Jack’s death and rebirth at around 1712, which puts it in the early 1700s.

So, going back to what the book says, if Jack WAS in fact reborn in the 1600s, then that could mean two things:

1. The movie does not take place in the year of 2012. Instead it would take place somewhere in the 1900s, possibly the 1990s given the modern look in the present day. But given the math, it doesn’t put Jack’s rebirth in the early 1600s.

2. Jack somehow was alive for 400 years instead of 300, which I got to say makes NO SENSE because it’s pretty much mentioned time and time again that Jack was alive for 300 years…not 400 years.

So, if we want to stick with the movie taking place in 2012, should we just assume the writers of the book made a small mistake? What you guys think?